Archive for July 2019

Collecting current history on climate change at the V&A

There are moments in history where it has been clear that history is being made. In 1963 when Martin Luther King Jr said ‘I Have a Dream’ or as the Apollo 11 made a successful moon landing where Neil Armstrong uttered ‘one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’ While those moments aren’t […]

Tate Galleries respond to calls to decrease emissions

Recently, a number of British institutions pledged to make serious efforts to reduce their carbon footprint to help reduce our impact towards issues around global warming. Now, Tate Modern, along with Tate Britain, Tate Liverpool, and Tate St. Ives have announced their new plans to reduce their emissions. The director of Tate Galleries said their […]

Whitney Museum, Biennial Protests and Kanders’ Resignation: What Happened

After weeks of escalating protests that led to eight artists pulling out of The Whitney Biennial, Warren B. Kanders finally gave in and resigned. The vice-chairman of The Whitney Museum of American Art in New York has been a subject of controversy after it was revealed that his company, Safariland, was supplying law enforcement and […]

Dora Maar at the Pompidou – Picasso’s devoted lover gets out from under his shadow

Dora, the “Weeping Woman.” Picasso immortalized the surrealist photographer Dora Maar in portraits over the course of their passionate, eight-year relationship in the 1930s. His 1937 image depict unbearable grief, with her fragmented features, colored acid green and the purple of bruises, heightening the painting’s emotional intensity, and making her image a symbol of emotional […]

Baltimore Museum of Art announces a center dedicated to Henri Matisse

The Baltimore Museum of Art, home to the largest public collection of Henri Matisse works, announced that it will soon open a dedicated Henri Matisse research and study center. Scheduled to open its doors in 2021, the 3,400-square-foot center will take place on the museum’s first floor and plans to show rotating exhibitions of Matisse’s […]

Appellate court upholds ruling by Justice Charles E. Ramos: what this means for Fritz Grünbaum’s heirs, works by Egon Schiele, and the HEAR act

After tediously fighting for two artworks by Egon Schiele, the heirs of Franz Friedrich ‘Fritz’ Grünbaum (1880-1941), a famous cabaret singer from Austria and a vocal critic of the Nazi party, are one step closer to possibly bringing the artworks home. On July 16th, a panel of five judges in a New York Appellate court […]

Shakespeare In The Park- the past and future of the outdoor bard

“Summer’s lease hath all too short a date”, to quote the Bard, and all the shorter when you start to plan what to do with that all too fleeting flick of time. Get out to the beach as much as possible, go for a road trip, have a few barbecues, and maybe finally get out […]